parents

Aunt of boy, 11, who died in ATV accident warns parents: ‘It was horrifying’

For many families, Fourth of July means enjoying outdoor activities together, and even though it’s a time to celebrate, taking precautions to protect your kids is still paramount.

That’s why Kristen Almer, whose 11-year-old nephew died in an all-terrain vehicle (ATV) accident in 2013, is calling on parents this weekend — and year round — to teach their kids about power sports safety.

According to a Consumer Federation of America report from 2018, July is the month with the most fatalities due to off-highway vehicles (OHVs), and the date with the highest number of fatalities is July 4.

Logan Almer’s story

On May 24, 2013, heading into Memorial Day weekend, Logan Almer, who lived with his father, mother and older brother in Minong, Wisconsin, got on his dad’s ATV when no adults were around, Almer told TODAY. He wasn’t wearing a helmet or other protective gear and drove the vehicle

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If schools don’t reopen, will parents have to choose between jobs and kids?

With as little as a month before school starts in some areas and COVID-19 diagnoses spiking in some of those same places, parents are wondering whether they have to choose between their jobs and their kids.

“This situation isn’t just untenable, it’s impossible.”

After word reached parents in New York City that the department of education was considering a hybrid plan for reopening schools that would allow students at school for part of the week, Smitten Kitchen founder Deb Perelman tweeted what she later called the “primal scream that we — and countless other parents for whom this situation isn’t just untenable, it’s impossible — have been feeling since March.”

%3Cblockquote%20class=%22twitter-tweet%22%3E%3Cp%20lang=%22en%22%20dir=%22ltr%22%3EWhat%E2%80%99s%20confusing%20to%20me%20is%20that%20these%20plans%20are%20moving%20forward%20apace%20without%20any%20consideration%20of%20the%20working%20parents%20who%20will%20be%20ground%20up%20in%20the%20gears%20when%20they%20collide.%20I%20wish%20someone%20would%20just%20say%20the%20quiet%20part%20loud:%20In%20the%20COVID%20economy,%20you%E2%80%99re%20only%20allowed%20a%20kid%20OR%20a%20job.%3C/p%3E—%20deb%20perelman%20(@debperelman)%20%3Ca%20href=%22https://twitter.com/debperelman/status/1275874412399603712?ref_src=twsrc%255Etfw%22%3EJune%2024,%202020%3C/a%3E%3C/blockquote%3E%20%3Cscript%20async%20src=%22https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js%22%20charset=%22utf-8%22%3E%3C/script%3E

Perelman said a hybrid reopening plan would leave working parents “ground up in the gears” between reopened cities and closed or partially closed schools.

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“I wish someone would just say the quiet part out loud,” Perelman tweeted. “In

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Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Miami officials have a few models for reopening schools. It’s up to parents to decide.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools’ plans keep shifting as coronavirus cases continue to spike exponentially.

The school district was due to announce its plan to reopen schools for the 2020-21 school year on Wednesday but postponed to squeeze in one more meeting with its work group of medical professionals and community members. The full plan will be presented at a special School Board meeting Wednesday, July 1.

“After the last Zoom call, as a parent, grandparent, I was extremely nervous and upset,” said Eileen Segal of the Family & Community Involvement Advisory Committee on Wednesday. “After listening today I feel a lot calmer.”

On Friday, the 23-member work group met virtually again to go over a revised draft plan. Seven models of how instruction would take place were whittled to four: A daily attendance at the schoolhouse model with reduced class sizes and social distancing; two hybrid models of in-person and

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