tech

Spouse cheating? 10 tech clues to find evidence

Years of marriage will hone a spouse’s instincts, and we often know when something seems funny. Smartphones, tablets, computers, and smart tech absorb adulterous evidence like a sponge. Once suspicions are aroused, a digital trail could contain many clues about a potential dalliance.

When looking for evidence of a cheater, partners can dig up a lot by looking at what or who a person searches for on the web and social media. On Facebook, you can see every single person someone has searched for if you know the secret.

Tap or click here to get the steps to see (and delete) a person’s search history on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and commonly used browsers.

Let me be clear: The best thing you can do is have a frank and honest conversation with your spouse about your marriage. Couples therapy can work wonders, and during this pandemic, virtual visits are likely covered

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‘Shocking level of bipartisan support’ means Big Tech is facing big (and costly) change

Once seen as a critical tool for internet platforms to police lewd and objectionable online speech, Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act has gained growing bipartisan support as a law in need of fixing.

Enacted in 1996, Section 230 exempts online platforms from liability for most user-generated speech. President Donald Trump has taken aim at changing the law in a fight against Twitter (TWTR), putting tech giants in legal and regulatory crosshairs that are likely to outlast the current election cycle.

Democrats and Republicans alike voice increasing antipathy over sweeping liability protections that 230 affords to all online platforms — including Facebook (FB), Instagram, YouTube (GOOG) (GOOGL). All told, experts say it’s becoming clear that change is coming.

“If Trump is reelected, frankly even if he isn’t reelected, you might see variations on this proposal coming into some type of effect next year, with a shocking level of bipartisan … Read More

The booming business of encrypted tech serving the criminal underworld

Criminals have turned to supposedly secure encrypted smartphones rather than normal messaging services - PA
Criminals have turned to supposedly secure encrypted smartphones rather than normal messaging services – PA

For the astonished detectives it was like “getting the keys to Aladdin’s cave”. Over the last few years, senior arms dealers and drug traffickers across Europe had come to rely on EncroChat, a shadowy tech company selling hyper-secure smartphones offering “guaranteed anonymity”.

Assured of their safety, crooks discussed products and prices in exhaustive detail, without the usual codewords. EncroChat’s steep subscription fees, running to thousands of pounds every year, were an offer no self-respecting contraband logistics professional could afford to refuse.

That is why EncroChat’s systematic infiltration by British and European police forces, finally made public on Thursday after more than 740 arrests, was an intelligence coup equal to the Enigma breakthroughs of the Second World War. One underworld insider, speaking to Vice News, was eloquent in their brevity: “People are f—–.”

EncroChat is far

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Tech giants face new fines and break-ups under UK recommendations

Apps - Yui Mok/PA
Apps – Yui Mok/PA

Britain’s monopolies watchdog has called for new powers to stop Google and Facebook abusing their dominant position in online advertising, including being able to levy fresh fines on the tech firms and split out their operations. 

In recommendations for the Government, the UK’s competition watchdog said “existing laws are not suitable for effective regulation”, and urged a new “pro competition regulatory regime” be established.

It said a new regulatory body, termed a “digital markets unit”, should be able to enforce a code of conduct to stop Google and Facebook from being able to engage in “exploitative or exclusionary practices”. The group should be able to impose significant fines if companies fail to alter their behaviour. 

The Competition and Markets Authority recommended that the unit should be able to order Google to open up its data to allow rival search engines to compete against it, as well

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India TikTok Ban Threatens China’s Rise as Global Tech Power

(Bloomberg) — China over the past decade built an alternate online reality where Google and Facebook barely exist. Now its own tech corporations, from Alibaba Group Holding Ltd. to Tencent Holdings Ltd., are getting a taste of what a shutout feels like.

India’s unprecedented decision to ban 59 of China’s largest apps is a warning to the country’s tech giants, who for years thrived behind a government-imposed Great Firewall that kept out many of America’s best-known internet names. If India finds a way to carry out that threat, it may present a model for other countries from Europe to Southeast Asia that seek to curtail the pervasiveness of apps like ByteDance Ltd.’s TikTok while safeguarding their citizens’ valuable data.

The surprise moratorium hit Chinese internet companies just as they were beginning to make headway in the world’s fastest-growing mobile arena, en route to going global and challenging American tech industry

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Tech employees are selling referrals online to job candidates for under $50 to help them get hired at Google, Facebook, and other industry giants

Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO's "Silicon Valley" TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.
Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO’s “Silicon Valley” TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.

Warner Bros/IMDb

  • A website is allowing prospective tech employees to anonymously purchase a job referral from existing tech workers for $20 to $50 apiece.

  • Rooftop Slushie, created by the makers of techie chat favorite Blind, has hosted 11,000 referral transactions since it was launched in 2019. Facebook and Google referrals are the most popular.

  • The “vendors” are established employees at companies like Amazon, Google, and Twitter who can become verified on the website and vet candidate submissions before accepting the deal.

  • The site’s product manager told One Zero that the service helps improve a skilled candidate’s chances of getting hired, but critics say paying for and accepting payment for a job referral is unethical.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The hiring process in the tech

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Tech companies make money off your data. Shouldn’t you be paid, too?

Whenever you sign up for a new social media service or website, or download an app onto your phone or computer, you’ll typically see some long disclaimer written in legalese. You scroll through it quickly and click “I agree.”

This fine print is known as a privacy policy. It lays out (sometimes in the most convoluted way possible) how the site or app can use or share your data. The problem is, no one actually reads it. You just click “Yes” and hope for the best, since that’s the price you pay for a free website, app or social media network. It seems like a pretty sweet deal.

But that’s not the deal we’re getting.

Our phones and computers can track our every movement and action. Facebook and Google log every “like” or click on their sites. There are numerous ways our data are collected, used, shared and sold by

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Tech Players Consolidate Healthcare Presence, Apple Takes Lead

Apple AAPL is dominating the wearables market, courtesy of Apple Watch. The company’s focus on health features like ECG and fall detection in the Apple Watch Series 4 has been a game changer.

Moreover, on Jun 23, the iPhone-maker previewed watchOS 7 at its first-ever virtual Worldwide Developers Conference (WWDC), delivering enhanced customization tools and new health and fitness features including sleep tracking, automatic handwashing detection, additional workout types including dance, and a new hearing health feature expanding insight into overall user well-being.

Moreover, the solid adoption of Apple Watch Series 5, has helped the iPhone maker strengthen its presence in the personal health monitor space. Notably, the smartwatch is based on watchOS 6, which comes with additional healthcare and fitness features like Cycle Tracking, the Noise app and Activity Trends.

This Zacks Rank #3 (Hold) company’s wide array of healthcare offerings in watchOS makes it a key differentiator in

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Make tech companies pay you for your data

Countless businesses collect, use, share and sell consumer data. The largest tech companies, like Facebook and Google, profit most. <span class="copyright">(Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images)</span>
Countless businesses collect, use, share and sell consumer data. The largest tech companies, like Facebook and Google, profit most. (Josh Edelson / AFP / Getty Images)

Whenever you sign up for a new social media service or website, or download an app onto your phone or computer, you’ll typically see some long disclaimer language written in legalese. You scroll through it quickly and click the “I agree” button.

This fine print is known as a privacy policy. It essentially lays out (sometimes in the most convoluted way possible) how the site or app can use or share your data. The problem is, no one actually reads the language. You just click “yes” and hope for the best, since that’s the price you pay for a free website or app or social media network. It seems like a pretty sweet deal. But that’s not the deal we’re getting.

Our phones and

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Domestic abusers use tech that connects as a weapon during coronavirus lockdowns

<span class="caption">Technology plays a major role in violence against women and girls.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/sad-teen-with-a-phone-in-her-bedroom-royalty-free-image/820379104" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:AntonioGuillem/iStock via Getty Images">AntonioGuillem/iStock via Getty Images</a></span>
Technology plays a major role in violence against women and girls. AntonioGuillem/iStock via Getty Images

The coronavirus pandemic has driven much of daily life – work, school, socializing – online. Unfortunately, perpetrators of violence against women and girls are also increasingly turning to technology in response to the pandemic.

Globally, violence against women and girls is a problem of pandemic proportions, with one in three experiencing an act of physical or sexual violence in her lifetime. Most of these acts of violence are perpetrated by intimate partners and family. In the United States, women are at increased risk of violence from a current or former intimate partner, and they are more likely than men to suffer injuries, be treated in emergency rooms and be killed as a result of intimate partner violence.

Violence against women and girls is costly for victims and their families, communities and society. The problem is

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