School

School District Opts To Reopen Schools, Make Face Masks Mandatory

TAMPA, FL — The Hillsborough County superintendent of schools has announced that students and staff returning to public schools on Aug. 10 will be required to wear face masks.

After meeting with health officials, business leaders, teachers and school administrators, Superintendent Addison Davis said he believes masks are the best option at this time for keeping students and staff safe from the spread of the coronavirus on campus.

The district will provide three reusable face coverings for each student on the first day of school and three reusable face coverings for each staff member during back-to-school pre-planning.

“The CDC has identified face masks as one of the most effective tools in stopping the spread of COVID-19,” Davis said. “I believe face coverings is the best option we have for providing additional protection for everyone on our campuses.”

He said the county has already acquired 760,000 masks through purchases and donations.

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Marietta Schools Make Masks Mandatory For Coming School Year

EAST COBB, GA — Marietta’s schools became the first in metro Atlanta Thursday to mandate that its students wear masks for the coming year.

In an email sent to students’ families Thursday night, superintendent Grant Rivera said face coverings would be required for all students from pre-K to 12th grade, according to The Marietta Daily Journal. Masks also would be required for staff and visitors, both in buildings and in buses.

Students were encouraged to bring their own washable masks, but disposable masks would be provided for students who didn’t have one.

“I acknowledge the decision to wear a face covering is very personal,” Rivera wrote in the email. “I also acknowledge, as we prioritize the safety of students and staff, that we are committed to being on the safe side of medical research and on the progressive side of student and staff safety.”

The Marietta mandate comes as other

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ICE Threatens to Deport Foreign Students if They’re Attending School via Zoom

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Like other schools, colleges and universities are in the midst of finalizing their plans for how to educate students while protecting them from the novel coronavirus. Will they remain online only, invite all students back to campus, or provide a hybrid of the two approaches so that fewer students will crowd together in buildings? U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) just complicated matters for the many schools with foreign students enrolled.

Back when all campuses shut down in the spring, ICE temporarily suspended a rule for type F-1 (academic coursework) and M-1 (vocational coursework) nonimmigrant student visas that had previously limited the number of online classes students could take. On Monday, instead of simply extending that suspension, the agency announced that in order to stay in the U.S., students can take some but not all their courses online. If their school goes online-only,

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The Best High School Movies to Make You Feel All the Nostalgic Feels

Photo credit: Abby Silverman
Photo credit: Abby Silverman

From Cosmopolitan

From football games to lunchroom fights to ruthless competition for the title of prom king or queen, high school is filled with enough angst and Hollywood-level theatrics to keep things interesting year after year—and movie after movie. Who doesn’t love watching a coming-of-age melodrama filled with actors who are not-so-secretly well above the legal drinking age? Makes me wonder where all the guys with chiseled jawlines and good style were when I was in school, but that’s beside the point.

Sure, some high school movies tend to be a little, shall we say, larger than life—I mean, how many high schoolers just happen to find out they’re royalty à la Princess Diaries? But who cares! Watching all of those extremely complicated friendship (and romantic) dynamics play out on the big screen is like a familiar (albeit slightly triggering) hug. From oldies like Sixteen

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Fauci hopes for vaccine in early 2021; new ‘pandemic potential’ found in China; Arizona delays school openings

A new pandemic threat could be simmering in China while at home the nation’s leading infectious disease expert expressed hope that a vaccine would be widely available early in 2021.

For now, though, more states are tightening restrictions aimed at tamping down an alarming boom in coronavirus cases. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut doubled the number of states on its quarantine list, to 16. Arizona delayed the start for in-class learning for the 2020-21 school year. Oregon and Kansas are the latest states that will begin to require face masks in public.

In China, researchers are concerned about a new swine flu strain in pigs that could have “pandemic potential.” At least one U.S. health official said the strain was not an immediate threat to Americans.

Here are some major developments:

  • Dr. Anthony Fauci and other top health officials testified before Congress Tuesday on the state of the pandemic. 

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Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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KNC Beauty Founder Launches Zoom School for Black Female Entrepreneurs

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Beauty entrepreneur Kristen Noel Crawley, the founder of KNC Beauty, is starting an online educational platform meant to help other Black female entrepreneurs succeed with their beauty businesses.

The program is called KNC Beauty School and it makes its debut online July 14. Crawley and other Black female executives, including Trinity Mouzon of Golde and Melissa Butler of The Lip Bar, will provide four semesters of free information on entrepreneurship, facing adversity, social media and marketing and strategic partnerships and investors.

“We’ll be going over resources and giving advice from other female founders to women of color who want to start a business or are in the early stages of their business,” Crawley said.

Interested entrepreneurs can sign up through a registration link available via Crawley’s Instagram account, where she has more than 400,000 followers.

Crawley had found that after speaking at industry

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