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NC not doing enough to protect immigrant farmworkers from coronavirus, advocates say

Reported coronavirus cases are rising among seasonal farmworkers living in migrant worker housing, a group setting like nursing homes that the state is watching.

On Tuesday, 128 new COVID-19 cases across four farms were reported through June, according to the N.C. Department of Health and Human Services.

That was more than double the 49 cases previously reported by The News & Observer. They bring the total number of infected farmworkers living in the camps to 177.

Six farms had active outbreaks in June compared to five active outbreaks reported in May. DHHS defines an outbreak as more than two cases but is only reporting them at facilities with at least 10 residents.

The cases reported are among seasonal immigrant farmworkers from Mexico who come to work in the United States on a temporary visa and live in grower-provided housing. Other infected workers who live in private residences not on farm

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High Risk for Coronavirus | Protect Yourself

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As the COVID-19 pandemic continues unfolding around the globe, people who are at higher risk for severe disease need to take special care.

COVID-19 appears to cause mild to moderate symptoms in most people who are infected. And some people seem to have no apparent effects from the virus.

But the older you are, the greater your risk for hospitalization, admission to an intensive care unit, being placed on a ventilator, and death, according to new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

For instance, people in their 50s are at higher risk than those in their 40s, and those in their 60s and 70s are at greater risk than those in their 50s, the CDC says. People 85 and older are at the greatest risk. (In the U.S., about 8 in 10 deaths from COVID-19 are

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Coronavirus drove a boom in virtual content; to protect artists, copyright law must catch up

John Krasinski's YouTube show "Some Good News" operated on a deep well of coronavirus good will that won't likely extend to its new platform, CBS. <span class="copyright">(YouTube)</span>
John Krasinski’s YouTube show “Some Good News” operated on a deep well of coronavirus good will that won’t likely extend to its new platform, CBS. (YouTube)

On April 19, Rainn Wilson (a.k.a. Dwight Schrute) appeared on John Krasinski’s YouTube show “Some Good News,” and warned his former “Office” cast member not to stream a Chance the Rapper song without first getting permission from the artist or the publishing company. Krasinski then brought Chance himself onto the show, and he gave the green light.

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated this type of abundant good will across media and entertainment businesses: DJs are spinning music free online; Alex “A-Rod” Rodriguez and Jennifer Lopez are posting dances to popular songs on TikTok, Broadway performers are singing tributes to Stephen Sondheim on YouTube, art gallery exhibitions have gone virtual and professional athletes are playing video games on ESPN.

But all these well-intentioned efforts have

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