Tag: plans

Posted in Business

Keep reduced Medicaid payments to health plans

The full effects of COVID-19 from a personal, societal, business and political standpoint will take years to fully understand. However, one indisputable fact that we know right now is that for health insurers, the decrease in the use of medical services has resulted in a dramatic reduction in medical expenses. In fact, utilization of non-emergent health care services declined by 30-50 percent over the first half of 2020.

When Michiganders moved from the workplace to in-home quarantine, employment statuses changed, and income became uncertain for many. In response, Priority Health, and many other insurers, adjusted premiums and waived cost sharing for many important services and benefits. In the Affordable Care Act market, Priority Health was one of the first insurance plans in the nation to provide premium credits to small group and individual members. We worked quickly to ensure our members, friends, neighbors and fellow Michiganders could maintain their coverage.

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Posted in Personal

A Small Georgia City Plans to Put Students in Classrooms This Week

Jefferson High seniors Hope Terhune and Rylee Meadows, who started a petition drive calling for a mandatory mask rule, in Jefferson, Ga., an hour's drive north of Atlanta, July 24, 2020. (Melissa Golden/The New York Times)
Jefferson High seniors Hope Terhune and Rylee Meadows, who started a petition drive calling for a mandatory mask rule, in Jefferson, Ga., an hour’s drive north of Atlanta, July 24, 2020. (Melissa Golden/The New York Times)

JEFFERSON, Ga. — When Jennifer Fogle and her family moved from Indiana to Georgia 13 years ago, they settled in Jefferson, a small, handsome city an hour’s drive from Atlanta, because they had heard about the excellent schools. And until recently, they had little to complain about. The teachers are passionate and committed, and the facilities rival those found at some private schools.

But in recent days Fogle found herself uncharacteristically anxious, after learning that Jefferson City Schools planned to offer face-to-face instruction in the midst of a resurgent coronavirus pandemic that has seen thousands of new cases reported daily in Georgia.

As other districts around the state delayed their back-to-school days or moved

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Posted in Insurance

‘I see a disaster in the making.’ Professors slam reopening plans at Illinois colleges amid COVID-19 crisis, prompting some schools to reverse course.

Illinois State University’s first attempt to articulate its vision for reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic this fall didn’t sit well with everyone.

The plan, dubbed “Redbirds Return” after the central Illinois college’s mascot, drew swift criticism from faculty after it was shared in early June, prompting instructors to draft their own proposals and call for greater precautions when scores of students are expected to descend on campus next month. The faculty’s letter objecting to plan has been signed by more than 500 employees, students, parents and other community members.

“Since releasing the plan, we’ve received a great deal of feedback,” ISU President Larry Dietz said earlier this month. “Many faculty and staff members have also made it clear they would like a greater voice formulating plans.”

At the same time, Dietz announced modifications the faculty had been seeking: increased flexibility to work from home, through at least December, and to

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Posted in Finance

‘Clear as mud’ housing refund plans irk college students

RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — When Laura Comino opened the housing email from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro in June, she knew she had to take action.

At the direction of the state’s public university system, UNCG asked her to sign a housing contract addendum acknowledging that she might not get a refund if the school kicks her out of her dorm in the fall because of the coronavirus pandemic.

An online petition Comino circulated days later collected nearly 40,000 signatures from people demanding that all 16 UNC System colleges offer prorated refunds and return deposits if the virus closes dorms.

“People got so incredibly upset thinking this would affect all of us, and there’s a possibility where it still might,” Comino said.

With classes scheduled to begin in August, the possibility of no refunds has left students and administrators alike with questions. Comino and the dean of her

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Posted in Personal

Fall 2020 Reopening Plans At The Top 100 U.S. Business Schools

They’ll be following all the rules this fall at the University of Michigan: masks, social distancing, smaller class sizes, frequent hand and surface washing, and more — much more. They’ll also be pioneering new rules for a new reality, particularly in the realm of remote instruction, as befits one of the country’s leading centers of social and cultural innovation. Put it all together and Scott DeRue, dean of the Ross School of Business, expects a memorable term.

“As with every year, I’m looking forward to welcoming students back to campus safely for a very successful fall term,” DeRue says. “Of course, I also recognize the profound difficulties that many of our students face in this moment, and that much uncertainty remains for all of us. We will get through this, and we will do it together.”

Five months after it shut down business school campuses and curtailed spring instruction and … Read More

Posted in Finance

Here’s how the pandemic is changing summer wedding plans

Couples that were planning to marry in 2020 have had to contend with a unique type of wedding planning stress.

The coronavirus has derailed plans and forced couples to reimagine their big celebrations. But engaged couples and newlyweds have shown that COVID-19 is no match for love and they are finding creative ways to wed under the constraints of the pandemic.

Scaling down in-person events, bisecting wedding ceremonies from receptions, and incorporating video conferencing so the occasion can be digitally shared to those far and wide are some of the emerging trends from the wedding industry.

Cashay editor Janna Herron sat down with Yahoo Money and Cashay reporter Stephanie Asymkos to discuss the trends and outlook in the latest episode of the Money, Honestly podcast. Their conversation is based on Stephanie’s Yahoo Money and Cashay reporting.

Seventy-six percent of summer weddings in 2020 are still happening in one way or another. (Photo: Getty)
Seventy-six percent of summer weddings in 2020 are still happening in one way or
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Posted in Money

Sacramento-area teachers react to plans for an online fall

In the wake of the news that public school campuses in Sacramento County will stay closed when instruction resumes in the fall, teachers are reacting with mixtures of relief and concern for their students, all while preparing for the upcoming school year.

The Sacramento County Office of Education announced Wednesday that its 13 districts, which serve more than 250,000 students from kindergarten through high school, will continue distance learning programs they implemented in the spring through the fall. The decision, made by schools officials, comes amid rising Covid-19 cases in the state, country and county.

Lori Jablonski is a government and geography teacher at C.K. McClatchy High School. She said that, amid rising cases and growing restrictions, the decision was expected. But even before the announcement, she struggled with the challenges online learning will present.

“I’m trying to view this as a challenge we can meet. I love teaching, and

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Posted in Money

Cost of ensuring school safety complicates reopening plans

As school districts across the country decide how and when they can bring students back to campus safely, a major sticking point is emerging: the money to make it happen.

Keeping public schools for 50 million students and more than 7 million staff safe from the coronavirus could require more teachers and substitutes, nurses and custodians. School districts will need to find more buses to allow for more space between children and buy more computers for distance learning. They’ll need to buy sanitizer, masks and other protective equipment. Some are putting up plastic dividers in offices and classrooms.

While public health concerns are getting most of the attention, especially with the nation’s infections and hospitalizations rising, costs have become a major consideration. Many districts are hoping Congress will step in.

The Council of Chief State School Officers says safely reopening public schools could cost between $158 billion and $245 billion,

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Posted in Personal

Kenya Barris On Mining His Life For ‘#BlackAF’, Being Noisier On Netflix & Plans For One More ‘Ish’ Spin-Off

Click here to read the full article.

Kenya Barris says he is working harder than he ever has in his life. The writer, who added actor to his resume with #blackAF, is working on a second season of the Netflix comedy, is plotting a feature-length music about Juneteenth with Pharrell Williams and is developing a multitude of comedies, dramas, films and documentaries under his multi-million dollar Netflix deal. He also still has a hand in the Black-ish universe and is plotting one more show in that universe.

Barris talks to Deadline about the process of creating #blackAF, becoming an actor for the first time, mining his own life for comedy, his take on critiquing Black shows, how he’s getting on in the streaming universe as well as plans for his production company Khalabo Ink Society.

More from Deadline

Inspired by Barris’ irreverent, highly flawed, unbelievably honest

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Posted in Personal

Duke plans mass COVID-19 testing and mix of in-person and online classes this fall

Duke University is planning to bring students, faculty and staff back to campus in August with new safety precautions, including mass COVID-19 testing, adjusted classroom layouts and revised housing options in dorms and hotels.

The school also announced the plan for its student-athletes to return to campus, beginning with football players on July 12.

The news comes as state health officials say they are concerned about the recent increase in COVID-19 cases among younger adults.

“While the trends we see today are concerning,” Duke president Vince Price said in a statement, “we believe that the many safety precautions we are putting in place will allow us to responsibly continue along the path towards opening Duke’s fall 2020 semester on campus in August. We ask all members of the Duke community — students, parents, faculty and staff — to recognize and accept that we may need to change our plans based

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