Facebook

Will the Facebook advertising boycott force the social media giant to change? Not likely

Hundreds of advertisers say they won’t spend money on Facebook in July or beyond over concerns the social media company isn’t doing enough to stop hate speech.  But the exodus of spenders may not be enough to push CEO Mark Zuckerberg to make the level of change that critics are demanding. 

Critics have an initial list of 10 recommendations that they say would help Facebook corral hate speech and make civil rights a priority when moderating content.

Zuckerberg and top executives, who have agreed to meet with the civil rights groups behind the Stop Hate for Profit boycott this week, plan to release the company’s third civil rights audit, which Facebook says will address many of the activists’ concerns, as well as other policy changes that were already under consideration.

The pressure on Facebook seems intense, but it may not be as powerful as the headlines make it appear.

Brands

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Done with Facebook? Consider MeWe, Parler or old standbys such as LinkedIn

MeWe is a social network that says it has no ads, spyware, targeting, political bias, or newsfeed manipulation. In other words, it bills itself as the “anti” Facebook. 

Parler is a social media app with one point of view: conservative. It’s a place for folks who don’t like the spin at Facebook, or as it describes itself, “free expression without violence and a lack of censorship.”

So maybe, like Coca-Cola, Unilver, Starbucks and other corporations, you’ve had it with Facebook and its policies about either not curbing hate speech, or if you’re on the other side of the aisle, censoring free thought. 

Where to go? We have some ideas for you. 

MeWe bills itself as the "anti-Facebook."
MeWe bills itself as the “anti-Facebook.”

Controversy: Trump’s Twitch channel suspended, and Reddit bans pro-Trump online group

Social: Facebook, social media under more pressure from brands over hate speech

LinkedIn

Yes, that network that for years was thought of

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Facebook Business Page Tips That Will Help You Make More Money

If you own a business, you need a web presence. First and foremost, that means you should have a great website. There’s no way around that. But what about social media? Is it necessary to have a Facebook business page?

Let’s see. In December 2019, Facebook had an average of 1.66 billion daily active users, according to its fourth quarter results. So, if you own a business, you want a Facebook page. The trick is to do it right.

Here’s how to make one that will not only start some social chatter but will create new customers for your business.

Building Your Facebook Business Page

The first thing you need to do is to create your Facebook business page. While it’s not difficult to do, you should be thoughtful about how you put it together. Here are a few tips.

Make a Professional, Not Personal Profile

You don’t want to

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How to Quit Facebook

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

There are lots of reasons someone might want to delete their Facebook account, from an effort to just spend less time on social media, to anger over privacy scandals or the presence of misinformation and hate groups on the platform.

Recently, many advertisers have quit Facebook too, at least temporarily, while calling for greater efforts by the company to crack down on misinformation and other harmful content.

If you want to give the platform one more chance, you could just adjust your Facebook privacy settings, or follow some steps for healthier social media use. Otherwise, read the following directions first to avoid some pitfalls.

Deactivate Your Facebook Account

If you just want to take a step back, Facebook gives you the option to deactivate your account temporarily. This allows you to reactivate any time you want, simply by logging

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Google and Facebook too powerful, says watchdog

The UK needs tougher rules to curb the dominance of Google and Facebook, including powers to break them up, the Competition and Markets Authority has said.

It is concerned that the firms’ dominance in digital advertising raises barriers for new competitors.

This may be pushing up prices for consumers, the CMA said.

The tech giants said they faced strong competition and that they would work with regulators on their concerns.

The CMA, which has been investigating their power in advertising for a year, said on Wednesday that it was “concerned that they have developed such unassailable market positions that rivals can no longer compete on equal terms”.

Google has more than 90% of the £7.3bn search advertising market in the UK, it said.

Facebook takes more than half of the £5.5bn UK online display advertising market.

The CMA said the services provided by Google and Facebook “are highly valued by

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UK’s competition regulator demands tougher action on Google and Facebook

The Unit would have a “fairness-by-design” policy, too, and the power to separate platforms — Facebook and Instagram, for instance, or Google and YouTube — if it was needed to “ensure healthy competition.”

These powers would be complimented by some company-specific initiatives. The regulator believes, for instance, that Google should be forced to hand over its search data — the questions people type and the links they click on, for instance — so that rivals can improve their own search algorithms and “properly compete.” The CMA also believes that the Unit should somehow “restrict” Google’s ability to be the default search engine on many device and browsers. Facebook, meanwhile, should be ordered to “increase its interoperability with competing social media platforms,” according to the CMA. Under the Unit’s orders, Facebook would also introduce an option that lets users decide whether they want to receive personalised ads.

These sorts of powers

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UK regulator urges reforms to curb Google, Facebook ad power

LONDON (AP) — British regulators want new rules to foster competition in digital advertising markets and rein in the industry’s dominant players, Google and Facebook.

The Competition and Markets Authority took aim at the U.S. tech giants in a report Wednesday that recommends the British government adopt a new regulatory approach to governing big digital platforms making money from online ads.

The authority said it was concerned that the two companies have developed “such unassailable market positions” that rivals can’t compete on equal terms, resulting in higher prices for hotels, flights, electronics, insurance and other goods and services that are heavily advertised online.

Google and Facebook accounted for about 80% of the 14 billions pounds ($17 billion) earned by the U.K.’s digital ad industry last year, the authority said. Google controls more than 90% of the U.K.’s 7.3 billion pound search advertising market while Facebook has more than half of

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CMA calls for new laws to rein in power of Facebook and Google

The UK’s competition watchdog is calling for the government to introduce tough new rules to rein in the power of Facebook (FB) and Google (GOOGL), following a year-long review into the digital advertising market.

The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) said on Wednesday it was recommending a new regulatory regime complete with enforcement powers to try and open up competition in the digital advertising market.

“Existing laws are not suitable for effective regulation,” the CMA said, calling for “a new pro-competition regulatory regime”.

The proposals are aimed squarely at Google and Facebook, which between them control 80% of UK online advertising.

“Through our examination of this market, we have discovered how major online platforms like Google and Facebook operate and how they use digital advertising to fuel their business models,” CMA chief executive Andrea Coscelli said in a statement.

“What we have found is concerning — if the market power

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Done with Facebook? Consider MeWe, Parler or old standbys like LinkedIn

MeWe is a social network that says it has no ads, spyware, targeting, political bias, or newsfeed manipulation. In other words, it bills itself as the “anti” Facebook. 

Parler is a social media app with one point of view: conservative. It’s a place for folks who don’t like the spin at Facebook, or as it describes itself, “free expression without violence and a lack of censorship.”

So maybe, like Coca-Cola, Unilver, Starbucks and other corporations, you’ve had it with Facebook and its policies about either not curbing hate speech, or if you’re on the other side of the aisle, censoring free thought. 

Where to go? We have some ideas for you. 

MeWe bills itself as the "anti-Facebook."
MeWe bills itself as the “anti-Facebook.”

Controversy: Trump’s Twitch channel suspended, and Reddit bans pro-Trump online group

Social: Facebook, social media under more pressure from brands over hate speech

LinkedIn

Yes, that network that for years was thought of

Read More

Tech employees are selling referrals online to job candidates for under $50 to help them get hired at Google, Facebook, and other industry giants

Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO's "Silicon Valley" TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.
Rooftop Slushie was reportedly named after a character in HBO’s “Silicon Valley” TV show depicting a strikingly accurate portrayal of the tech industry.

Warner Bros/IMDb

  • A website is allowing prospective tech employees to anonymously purchase a job referral from existing tech workers for $20 to $50 apiece.

  • Rooftop Slushie, created by the makers of techie chat favorite Blind, has hosted 11,000 referral transactions since it was launched in 2019. Facebook and Google referrals are the most popular.

  • The “vendors” are established employees at companies like Amazon, Google, and Twitter who can become verified on the website and vet candidate submissions before accepting the deal.

  • The site’s product manager told One Zero that the service helps improve a skilled candidate’s chances of getting hired, but critics say paying for and accepting payment for a job referral is unethical.

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The hiring process in the tech

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