Face

Where to Buy Face Masks Online That Are Stylish

The fashion world is stepping up in a time of need: Countless companies are now making, selling and donating non-medical grade face masks for daily protection from COVID-19.

Demand for cloth face mask options has soared in recent months, in part because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) masks in public settings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. PPE masks are usually made from breathable a fabric like cotton and differ from a surgical mask and N95 respirators that experts say should be reserved for health care workers who are caring for the sick.

In times of crisis, it’s heartwarming to see companies we love giving back using the tools and skills they know best. Nordstrom, the largest employer of tailors in the country, has trained its alterations teams to make face masks to distribute to health care workers, while designer

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How to Sew Comfortable and Protective Face Masks at Home

From Good Housekeeping

As more information about the coronavirus pandemic develops, some of the information in this story may have changed since it was last updated. For the most up-to-date information on COVID-19, please visit the online resources provided by the CDC, WHO, and your local public health department.

Making a DIY face mask has become the top stay-home activity during the novel coronavirus outbreak – whether it’s for your own personal use or to donate to healthcare facilities. The CDC recommends wearing a face covering any time you go out in public, and several state and local governments are now requiring it as COVID-19 cases continue to rise. On top of that, medical face masks for healthcare workers have been running low due to high demand for personal protective equipment (PPE).

Hospitals are asking for donations of N-95 respirators (the CDC-recommended masks for healthcare professionals working with infectious patients).

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School District Opts To Reopen Schools, Make Face Masks Mandatory

TAMPA, FL — The Hillsborough County superintendent of schools has announced that students and staff returning to public schools on Aug. 10 will be required to wear face masks.

After meeting with health officials, business leaders, teachers and school administrators, Superintendent Addison Davis said he believes masks are the best option at this time for keeping students and staff safe from the spread of the coronavirus on campus.

The district will provide three reusable face coverings for each student on the first day of school and three reusable face coverings for each staff member during back-to-school pre-planning.

“The CDC has identified face masks as one of the most effective tools in stopping the spread of COVID-19,” Davis said. “I believe face coverings is the best option we have for providing additional protection for everyone on our campuses.”

He said the county has already acquired 760,000 masks through purchases and donations.

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2020 graduates face uncertain job market with hope

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – If everything had gone according to plan, Missy Wood thought she’d have a job helping at-risk youths by now. 

Wood, a recent graduate of Middle Tennessee State University, saw her internship with Court-Appointed Special Advocates end abruptly in March as the COVID-19 pandemic took root in Tennessee. She started applying for jobs with the Department of Children’s Services and similar organizations in April.

By the time she graduated in May, new job postings for her chosen career had all but disappeared.

Wood is one of the thousands of graduates across the nation who face a turbulent job market amid the novel coronavirus pandemic. More than 47 million Americans have filed jobless benefit claims since the middle of March, according to the Labor Department.  

Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family's backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the two play on the trampoline. Wood has been looking for work since April but has not been able to find any child-focused social work positions since graduating from MTSU in May. After the pandemic hit, job postings for her planned career seemed to disappear.
Eli Kellum, 7, climbs on the back of babysitter Missy Wood in the Kellum family’s backyard in Murfreesboro on June 18, 2020, as the
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Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.
Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Nobu Shiozawa is determined to get customers his restaurant’s homemade tofu and sushi without using delivery apps such as Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash, and Postmates.

That’s not easy these days. Thanks to COVID-19, New York City banned restaurant dining in March. So Shiozawa, who owns and manages in New York City, uses his own small crew to avoid high commissions from the apps, usually .

“If I start using the food delivery service providers during the pandemic, the number of orders and the amount of sales would be increased,” he admitted.

But then he would have to hire more workers to handle the extra orders, which was hard for him to justify with the high fees and the fact he cut more than 60 percent of his staff after the pandemic started.

Image: Nobu Shiozawa

Image:

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How 1 store wants to make buying face masks fun

With coronavirus cases continuing to increase across the country, this one mall store wants to help by dedicating its shelves to personal protective equipment for adults and kids.

Shield Pals, which sells PPE like cloth masks, face shields, hand sanitizer and gowns, opened on June 27 at The Mall of Columbia in Columbia, Maryland, in a retail space formerly occupied by an Apple store.

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“We wanted people to be able to look at the masks, and touch and feel them because so much of (mask buying) has been online that you don’t always know what you’re getting,” co-founder Chris McCormick told TODAY Style. “We just want to help people feel more comfortable about shopping and being out in public while staying safe.”

The store is believed to be the first retail PPE-only store in a U.S. mall, a

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Tech giants face new fines and break-ups under UK recommendations

Apps - Yui Mok/PA
Apps – Yui Mok/PA

Britain’s monopolies watchdog has called for new powers to stop Google and Facebook abusing their dominant position in online advertising, including being able to levy fresh fines on the tech firms and split out their operations. 

In recommendations for the Government, the UK’s competition watchdog said “existing laws are not suitable for effective regulation”, and urged a new “pro competition regulatory regime” be established.

It said a new regulatory body, termed a “digital markets unit”, should be able to enforce a code of conduct to stop Google and Facebook from being able to engage in “exploitative or exclusionary practices”. The group should be able to impose significant fines if companies fail to alter their behaviour. 

The Competition and Markets Authority recommended that the unit should be able to order Google to open up its data to allow rival search engines to compete against it, as well

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America’s national parks face existential crisis over race

As millions of Americans escape home quarantine to the great outdoors this summer, they’ll venture into parks, campgrounds and forest lands that remain stubborn bastions of self-segregation.

“The outdoors and public lands suffer from the same systemic racism that the rest of our society does,” said Joel Pannell, associate director of the Sierra Club, which is leading an effort to boost diversity in the wilderness and access to natural spaces.

New government data, shared first with ABC News, shows the country’s premier outdoor spaces — the 419 national parks — remain overwhelmingly white. Just 23% of visitors to the parks were people of color, the National Park Service found in its most recent 10-year survey; 77% were white. Minorities make up 42% of the U.S. population.

“That tells me that we’ve got a lot of work to do,” said David Vela, acting director of the National Park Service.

The career

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Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Where to Buy Face Masks That Are Stylish Online

The fashion world is stepping up in a time of need: Countless companies are now making, selling and donating non-medical grade face masks for daily protection from COVID-19.

Demand for cloth face mask options has soared in recent months, in part because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) masks in public settings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. PPE masks are usually made from breathable a fabric like cotton and differ from a surgical mask and N95 respirators that experts say should be reserved for health care workers who are caring for the sick.

In times of crisis, it’s heartwarming to see companies we love giving back using the tools and skills they know best. Nordstrom, the largest employer of tailors in the country, has trained its alterations teams to make face masks to distribute to health care workers, while designer

Read More