Tag: crisis

Posted in Insurance

Activation of Florida National Guard creates health care insurance crisis for family

RIVERVIEW, Fla. (WFLA) — When the Florida National Guard activated and deployed her husband’s unit – the 164th Air Defense Artillery Brigade – medical insurance for Holly Fuentes and her 6 children was supposed to seamlessly transfer from her TriCare Reserve Select plan to a TriCare plan for active-duty personnel.

The 164th was activated on Aug. 14, 2020.

“As of Aug. 14, we have no health insurance coverage and we have 6 kids, the newest being 8 weeks old,” Holly told 8 On Your Side.

Holly, who lives in Riverview, was forced to cancel several doctors’ appointments and let a $600 per month prescription for her son go unfilled.

“The most pressing is our 8 week old needs to see a G.I. specialist and I can’t have that done because of the insurance,” she said.

When her husband’s Natl Guard unit was activated, Holly and her family were left without
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Posted in Personal

Small businesses using personal funds to stay afloat during coronavirus crisis, study finds

One-third of small businesses are relying on personal funds to stay afloat during the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent economic lockdown, according to new findings published Thursday.

A CreditCards.com report found that 35 percent of small business decision-makers said either they or their businesses’ owners have used their own money to help the business survive the crisis. That includes 24 percent who say they or the owners used a personal credit card and 21 percent who tapped a personal savings account since March.

HALF OF US JOBS LOST TO VIRUS COULD BE GONE PERMANENTLY, POLL FINDS

Still, small businesses also turned to other resources during the virus outbreak: About 30 percent of respondents said they applied for and received loans through the taxpayer-funded $670 billion Paycheck Protection Program. If at

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Posted in Insurance

‘I see a disaster in the making.’ Professors slam reopening plans at Illinois colleges amid COVID-19 crisis, prompting some schools to reverse course.

Illinois State University’s first attempt to articulate its vision for reopening amid the coronavirus pandemic this fall didn’t sit well with everyone.

The plan, dubbed “Redbirds Return” after the central Illinois college’s mascot, drew swift criticism from faculty after it was shared in early June, prompting instructors to draft their own proposals and call for greater precautions when scores of students are expected to descend on campus next month. The faculty’s letter objecting to plan has been signed by more than 500 employees, students, parents and other community members.

“Since releasing the plan, we’ve received a great deal of feedback,” ISU President Larry Dietz said earlier this month. “Many faculty and staff members have also made it clear they would like a greater voice formulating plans.”

At the same time, Dietz announced modifications the faculty had been seeking: increased flexibility to work from home, through at least December, and to

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Posted in Finance

Coronavirus: Money questions to ask your partner in a crisis

Aaron Clarke is a certified financial planner and wealth advisor at Halpern Financial.

Money can often be a complicated topic with your partner in normal times, but the pandemic has only increased that financial stress for many couples. Even in the best of times, if there is a misalignment of what each person finds important and the couple can’t talk about these differences, it is bound to be a pain point.

Here are a few helpful ways to navigate challenging financial times with your spouse or partner — and maybe even improve your long-term financial picture at the same time.

A couple wearing masks are seen hugging on the sidewalk as the city enters Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on July 21, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images)
A couple wearing masks are seen hugging on the sidewalk as the city enters Phase 4 of re-opening following restrictions imposed to slow the spread of coronavirus on July 21, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images)

Even beyond the traditional “are you a saver or a

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Posted in Insurance

NYC Property Mogul Charles Cohen Sticks With Buy-and-Hold Plan in Crisis

(Bloomberg) — All over Manhattan, trouble is brewing for billionaire Charles Cohen.

Rent collections lag at the Decoration & Design Building, his Midtown showroom palace for interior designers. He’s 60 days delinquent on loan payments for his 42-floor office tower at 3 Park Avenue South.

Even Quad Cinema, his beloved art-house theater in Greenwich Village, is dark — yet another sign of the travails facing the Cohen empire in the time of Covid-19.

If Cohen is sweating, he’s not admitting it. He is, after all, the scion of one of the city’s great real-estate families, with the psychic freedom of a $3.6 billion fortune.

“New York is going to get through this,” Cohen, 68, said during an interview from his Lexington Avenue headquarters. “At the end of the day, there’s no place like New York.”

Still, the pressure is building — and not only for Charles Cohen. The pandemic threatens

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Posted in Finance

Norwalk Agency Makes Senior Connection During Coronavirus Crisis

NORWALK, CT — Nearly one-third of older adults experience loneliness or social isolation, and that was before the coronavirus outbreak. If there has been any benefit that the elderly have derived from COVID-19, it’s that the pandemic has focused increased attention on the importance of keeping senior members of the community engaged.

St. Louis University sociologists Marla Berg-Weger and J. E. Morley, writing in “The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging”, said that,”With sheltering-in-place and stay-at-home orders, many older adults lost usual ways to connect with support networks and health and social service providers and are spending increased time alone. Many of the traditional strategies for engaging older adults have become obsolete in the new normal.”

Family & Children’s Agency, based in Norwalk, serves more than 13,000 people in Fairfield County. A good number of them are seniors, for whom FCA provides emergency alert systems, caregiver support, personal care attendants,

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Posted in Personal

Choose your startup’s crisis strategy: Offensive vs defensive

Businesses of all shapes and sizes have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, however, startups and small-to-medium-sized businesses are proving particularly vulnerable.

Seemingly overnight, businesses have seen their clients become ‘at risk,’ their sales have dipped, and operations have slowed to a snail’s pace. With venture capital investment predicted to slump by billions of dollars in 2020, and government support packages slow off the mark, there is little help on the horizon for many businesses.

Business leaders are now determining how best to advance. In the same way a paramedic checks vitals before providing treatment, founders have to assess their company’s general health before taking action.

[Read: Why your website’s lack of accessibility options is opening you up to lawsuits]

Depending on the results, their startup will either have to follow an aggressive business strategy or take a more conservative path in order to survive. Failure to do

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Posted in Money

As the COVID-19 economic crisis deepens, financially risky MLMs are moving in to fill the employment void

Mary Kay is one of the oldest and most well known MLMs.
Mary Kay is one of the oldest and most well known MLMs.

Anna Webber/Getty Images for Mary Kay

  • Stuck at home and unemployed, some people are turning to multi-level marketing companies, or MLMs, to make cash.

  • MLMs promise the opportunity to “work for yourself,” but these companies often require people to shell out for products and training sessions upfront.

  • Women and people of color are most likely to be swayed by the promise of an MLM, according to a survey from AARP.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

Emily Jones entered the world of MLMs as a customer. It was 2018, she was preparing for a vacation to Europe and looking for inexpensive jewelry to wear. A friend introduced her to Paparazzi Accessories.

The jewelry was cute, she said, so when Christmas rolled around, she ordered additional pieces to give away as gifts. The friend who sold the jewelry to

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Posted in Insurance

How a ‘perfect storm’ of issues during the pandemic has led to a mental health crisis in Latinx communities

Design: Nathalie Cruz for Yahoo Life
Design: Nathalie Cruz for Yahoo Life

July is BIPOC (Black, Indigenous and People of Color) Mental Health Month, also referred to as Minority Mental Health Awareness Month. In an effort to bring awareness to struggles that people of color face regarding mental health in the U.S., Yahoo Life is republishing this story. It was originally published on April 30, 2020 at 2:06 p.m. ET.

Experts say that many Latinx communities across the United States are in the midst of a mental health crisis during the coronavirus pandemic because of economic and public health disparities as well as cultural stigma around mental health issues.

Margarita Alegria, a professor at the Harvard Medical School and chief of the Disparities Research Unit at Massachusetts General Hospital, says the combination of stress over employment, lack of insurance and lack of information has created a perfect storm for Latinx communities. 

“These disparities have been amplified

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Posted in Personal

We’re Facing a Mental Health Crisis in Healthcare Workers, the Majority of Whom Are Women

More than 130,000 Americans have died from COVID-19, a novel strain of coronavirus, and cases continue to surge in communities across the country. But for front-line medical workers, particularly those working in emergency rooms and treating COVID-19 patients, the fight has only just begun.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that at least 515 healthcare workers have died so far after contracting COVID-19 – with 34 percent of cases still unreported – a larger, potentially even more deadly crisis is looming. For doctors, nurses, hospital cleaners, and other staff members on the front lines – nearly 80 percent of whom are women, according to the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics – it’s their mental health that has been devastated, and this country is beyond ill-equipped to help them repair it.

“Trauma does not have a timeline, so we will be seeing the ramifications from this

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