boom

Coronavirus drove a boom in virtual content; to protect artists, copyright law must catch up

John Krasinski's YouTube show "Some Good News" operated on a deep well of coronavirus good will that won't likely extend to its new platform, CBS. <span class="copyright">(YouTube)</span>
John Krasinski’s YouTube show “Some Good News” operated on a deep well of coronavirus good will that won’t likely extend to its new platform, CBS. (YouTube)

On April 19, Rainn Wilson (a.k.a. Dwight Schrute) appeared on John Krasinski’s YouTube show “Some Good News,” and warned his former “Office” cast member not to stream a Chance the Rapper song without first getting permission from the artist or the publishing company. Krasinski then brought Chance himself onto the show, and he gave the green light.

The COVID-19 pandemic has generated this type of abundant good will across media and entertainment businesses: DJs are spinning music free online; Alex “A-Rod” Rodriguez and Jennifer Lopez are posting dances to popular songs on TikTok, Broadway performers are singing tributes to Stephen Sondheim on YouTube, art gallery exhibitions have gone virtual and professional athletes are playing video games on ESPN.

But all these well-intentioned efforts have

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Fashion Influencers Are Driving an Interiors Boom. How Are Home Brands Responding?

“A lot of people in fashion don’t understand that you can’t easily gift a rug or table. It doesn’t work the same as it does for a dress or a pair of shoes.”

Home is where the #content is — or so wrote Hilary George-Parkin in a 2017 Fashionista story titled, “Why Fashion Bloggers Are Evolving Into Home Decor Influencers.”

Three years later, may I ask: Why were once-strictly-fashion-adjacent influencers venturing into more home-furnished pastures? 

George-Parkin’s reporting is certainly worth revisiting in its own right, but for the interest of this piece, I’ll say the gist was this: With the influencer class having, well, influenced our clothing and accessories to a certain degree of satisfaction, our homes became their next logical frontier with which to express their particular stamps of style.

With the help of an affiliate link or 15, these professional tastemakers have come to establish themselves as bona

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It’s boom times for sign makers. So why aren’t they making more money?

Tim Seiger was preparing to start a big project at Angel Stadium of Anaheim in mid-March when California announced a statewide shutdown to combat the coronavirus.

His gig ground to a halt, indefinitely.

The 42-year-old isn’t a groundskeeper or construction worker.

He makes signs.

The Placentia resident’s company, Ultimate Design, was partnering with another firm to wrap bars and suites in the ballpark with lettering in anticipation of Opening Day. And now the Angels wouldn’t let anyone in the building.

For about a week, as other clients quickly called off projects, jobs slowed down. Seiger prepared for the worst.

But in a proverbial sign of the times, the life-altering COVID-19 pandemic — and its many demands on human behavior — came with a great need: for signs. And lots of them.

Flags and awnings and lawn signs now sway in front of businesses where there weren’t any before. Arrows placed

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