Tag: Black

Posted in Personal

Superman Is Back In Black As Zack Snyder Provides ‘Justice League’ Director’s Cut Sneak Peek

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The much anticipated Zack Snyder cut of Justice League won’t make an appearance on streamer HBO Max until next year, but the superhero team up flick’s original director today teased out a taste of what is to come – a small taste.

Though Warner Brothers didn’t bring any of its caped crusaders to this year’s virtual Comic-Con@Home, Snyder and the portraying Ray Fisher individually joined fanfest Justice Con on Saturday to talk about the 2017 film. Though Snyder shot most of Justice League, Joss Whedon stepped in to do reshoots and handle post on after the Man of Steel director  had to step away from filming Justice League due to a personal tragedy – and as you can see below from the clip Snyder showed today at the 31:43 mark, that Henry Cavill played Man of Steel had a very different look

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Posted in Money

Case of teen jailed for missing online classwork shows how schools and courts oppress Black students

While school districts all over the country grapple with how to best educate youth this upcoming academic year during a global pandemic, one Michigan teen sits in a juvenile detention center with no prospect of returning to in-person or remote learning anytime soon. The 15-year-old, identified only as Grace, has been in jail since May because she violated the terms of her probation by not completing her online coursework, according to a new report co-authored by ProPublica Illinois and the Detroit Free Press.

Grace, who is Black and has diagnosed ADHD, was on probation for fighting with her mom and stealing a cellphone from a classmate. After her school transitioned to remote learning on April 15, Grace said she felt unmotivated and overwhelmed by the work for her school, located in the predominantly white community of Beverly Hills, Mich.

That’s true of many students displaced from their schools, but, calling

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Posted in Money

Teen jailed for missing online classwork shows how schools and courts oppress Black students

While school districts all over the country grapple with how to best educate youth this upcoming academic year during a global pandemic, one Michigan teen sits in a juvenile detention center with no prospect of returning to in-person or remote learning any time soon. The 15-year-old, only identified as Grace, has been in jail since May because she violated the terms of her probation by not completing her online coursework, according to a new report co-authored by ProPublica Illinois and The Detroit Free Press.

Grace, who is Black and has diagnosed ADHD, was on probation for fighting with her mom and stealing a cell phone from a classmate. After her school transitioned to remote learning on April 15, Grace said she felt unmotivated and overwhelmed by the work for her school, located in the predominantly white community of Beverly Hills, Michigan.

That’s true of many students displaced from their schools,

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Posted in Business

These Black entrepreneurs stepped up to make sunscreen for darker skin

 <span class="copyright">(Alana Hunter / For The Times)</span>
(Alana Hunter / For The Times)

When Los Angeles resident Katonya Breaux was in her late 30s, she began noticing black moles on her face. It was an occurrence she assumed was genetic after witnessing the same spots on older women in her family. Breaux, the mother of singer Frank Ocean, consulted with her doctor on how to slow down the appearance of more spots.

She was met with a surprising response.

He said, ‘You know it’s not genetic, right? It’s sun damage,’” says Breaux, who, as a Black woman, had not worn sunscreen on a regular basis.

“I went to Walgreens, didn’t know anything about sunscreen and grabbed what was there. The products I tried led to skin irritation,” says Breaux, who discovered mineral formulas, which were less irritating yet created a chalky white cast on her skin. “Other brands were not tinted with me in mind and left

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Posted in Business

How To Make Black Lives Matter At Harvard Business School

When I first heard that Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria had publicly apologized for the school’s numerous failures to the African-American community, I was both surprised by his personal confession of complicity and highly skeptical that the anti-Black culture that he had led for a decade would substantially improve. As a senior lecturer at the school for seven years from 2012 to 2019, I had been regularly lobbying Dean Nohria on Black issues. I would initiate meetings with him every year in the fall and spring, armed with my sheet of paper with “Black Agenda” handwritten on the top. I wrongfully assumed that a “man of color” would want to rid the school of its anti-Black racism. Boy, was I wrong! There was no progress.

And then, when I finally read his entire apology, I was outraged and glad that I had retired from the toxic anti-Black environment. The … Read More

Posted in Business

Inside historic black bookstores’ fight for survival against the COVID-19 pandemic

OAKLAND, Calif. – Inside Marcus Books, the nation’s oldest black-owned bookstore, no one lingers anymore over shelves lined with a diasporic collection of African and African American history, culture, music and literature.

Staffers take phone orders from the safety of their homes. Shoppers keep their distance when darting in and out to pick up purchases. Blanche Richardson, whose parents founded Marcus Books 60 years ago, works alone in the store, putting on a protective mask for curbside deliveries.

Operating in a state of emergency is nothing new for independent black-owned bookstores, which for decades have survived on the margins of the publishing industry. But COVID-19 is posing a new kind of existential threat, Richardson says. Most bookstores have seen a drop in overall book sales even as online sales pick up.

“The pandemic exacerbated the plight of the few remaining black bookstores across the country,” Richardson told USA TODAY.

Black

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Posted in Insurance

Black, female entrepreneurs are changing Silicon Valley

SAN FRANCISCO – In the early days of Zume Pizza, visitors to Julia Collins’ robotic food prep company in Silicon Valley would greet her at the door and say, “Can you grab me a water? I’m here to meet with the founder.” When pitching her business to investment partners at venture capital firms, Collins was nearly always the only woman and always the only black person in the room.

Then, late last year, a hairline crack surfaced in the invisible yet seemingly impenetrable barrier that limits black women’s access to the tech world. A $375 million investment gave Zume Pizza a valuation of $2.25 billion.

It wasn’t just the company she co-founded that reached unicorn status. Collins did, too, as the first black woman whose tech company is valued at $1 billion or more by investors. Now that she’s working on a new startup in regenerative agriculture, investors are calling

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Posted in Personal

Buying Black Has Never Mattered More

Nearly two months into the current Black Lives Matter protests, many activists are now asking supporters to focus their attention on economic inequality and to promote Black businesses.

Their energies will coalesce on July 7, a.k.a. Blackout Day 2020—when Black people and other people of color (along with their allies) are being encouraged to avoid shopping online or in-person. If you must buy something, it should be from a Black-owned business.

Blackout days have been introduced before, but this year’s campaign has particular potency. Originally conceived by musician Calvin Martyr and the Blackout Coalition, its purpose is two-fold, Martyr says: to put corporate America on notice and to bring attention (and money) to Black business owners, designers, and artists.

The Blackout Coalition’s social media describes it as the first step in a continued effort “to rebuild the Black dollar.” The timing couldn’t be more critical: As the COVID-19 pandemic continues

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Posted in Money

Virus, Floyd death merge in brutal blow to Black well-being

Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately.

They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And they are especially prone to diabetes, hypertension and other chronic diseases that can be tricky to manage even in normal times.

Then came COVID-19 and George Floyd — one killing Black people in alarming numbers, the other shining a harsh light on systemic racism. In a matter of months and nearly 8 minutes, it became clear that institutions designed to ensure the two most important things in life — health and safety — had converged to turn against one segment of the population in stark, horrific ways.

It’s a brutal blow to Black people’s well-being and renewed calls for racial justice in all realms

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Posted in Finance

Record cash floods Democrats, Black groups amid protests and pandemic

Online donors poured a record $392 million into campaigns and causes via ActBlue in June, a sign of surging activism and political enthusiasm on the left that smashed the previous monthly high, from just before the 2018 election, by a whopping 50 percent.

The eye-popping numbers on ActBlue, the favored digital fundraising platform for the Democratic Party as well as a growing host of left-leaning nonprofits, make for a startling split-screen next to Great Depression-level unemployment and spiking coronavirus cases across the country.

But the left’s online giving surge is blunting one of President Donald Trump’s remaining advantages in the presidential election, as his poll numbers sink: his financial edge. Small-dollar donors are filling up Joe Biden’s campaign coffers, giving Democratic Senate and House candidates a financial cushion in many of the biggest 2020 elections, and pouring resources into newly emboldened civil rights organizations, which are scaling up rapidly amid

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