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Could a boycott kill Facebook?

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Boycotts can be extremely effective – as Facebook is finding out.

In the late 18th century, the abolitionist movement encouraged British people to stay away from goods produced by slaves. It worked. Around 300,000 stopped buying sugar – increasing the pressure to abolish slavery.

The Stop Hate for Profit campaign is the latest movement to use boycott as a political tool. It claims that Facebook doesn’t do enough to remove racist and hateful content from its platform.

It’s convinced a series of major companies to pull advertising from Facebook and some other social media companies.

Among the latest to do so are Ford, Adidas and HP. They join earlier participants including Coca-Cola, Unilever and Starbucks.

News site Axios has also reported that Microsoft suspended advertising on Facebook and Instagram in May because of concerns about unspecified “inappropriate content” – a development the BBC can confirm.

Meanwhile, other online platforms,

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What does Miami distillery make when bars are closed? (Hint: Don’t drink it.)

Toast Distillers’ signature product was premium vodka. But when unemployment increased and medical supplies became scarce nationwide, Toast switched formulas to solve both problems.

The company hired 15 new employees as it shifted production from spirits to hand sanitizer, said founder and CEO Dieuveny “DJ” Jean Louis. The “EZ Hand Sanitizer” is created in a partnership with the Cosmetic Corporation of America, Inc. and Veritas Farms, Inc.., which sells its products in Walgreens, CVS and Rite Aid.

“When the whole pandemic happened, we saw a window of opportunity,” he said.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic Toast distillers began using their alcohol distilling facility to produce hand sanitizer. It is mostly for sale but they have donated as well.
Due to the coronavirus pandemic Toast distillers began using their alcohol distilling facility to produce hand sanitizer. It is mostly for sale but they have donated as well.

Toast Distillers now employs about 30 people. Louis said he has not had to apply for any government aid because of a public demand for the new product. Toast Distillers came together

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Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Canada’s models show virus slowing but could surge at any time, PM won’t open border soon

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 102,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,500 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

June 29

1:25 p.m.: Canada’s top doctor stresses the importance of contact tracing as COVID-19 continues to pop up in

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How Beauty E-commerce Will Evolve Over the Next Year

Click here to read the full article.

The coronavirus pandemic is to e-commerce sales what the bullet train was to rail travel — a transformational accelerator of a wide-spread behavior.

During the crisis, with all but nonessential brick-and-mortar stores closed, consumers had no choice but to buy online — some for the first time ever. But as stores start the laborious process of reopening, one thing is clear: For many people, the migration to e-commerce will be permanent — and the implications for selling beauty are significant.

“In the last three to four months, we’ve seen changes that we would have expected over the last three to four years,” says Oliver Wright, global lead of Accenture’s Consumer Goods practice. “Before COVID-19, about 20 to 30 percent of the population in most countries were hesitant to make purchases online. This group has been broken through, and as a result, we’re seeing

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Domino’s expands delivery options, home buying moves online

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Monday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

________________________

FOOD SERVICE:

— Domino’s Pizza is now offering carside delivery service, allowing customers to stay in their cars while one of the pizza company’s workers delivers their order to them.

The chain said Monday that customers can choose the new contactless carryout option when placing a prepaid order online. It is available in U.S. stores.

When a customer places a carside delivery order online, they’ll be prompted to add their vehicle color, make and model, which will be used to identify them when they arrive at the store. Customers can also choose where they’d like their order placed – the passenger side, back seat, trunk or the option to decide when they arrive.

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Mississippi Mayor Has A Blunt Message For Coronavirus Conspiracy Theorists

The mayor of a small city in Mississippi is winning praise on social media for deftly calling out all the latest right-wing conspiracy theories. 

Jason Shelton, the Democratic mayor of Tupelo ― the birthplace of Elvis ― posted a message on Facebook to urge his city’s residents to listen to healthcare professionals and wear masks to stop the spread of the coronavirus. 

Last week, Shelton signed an order requiring face coverings for most people in indoor public and business spaces.

“My job as mayor is do to my best to keep our community safe, not make easy or politically popular decisions,” he wrote, then added: 

“Also, ANTIFA is not coming to Tupelo, Elvis statues are not being removed, you are not the target of some type of global conspiracy, it is impossible to erase history and no one has attempted to do so, COVID is not a hoax, you shouldn’t

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Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

Read More

Restaurants are ‘hurting’, says Deliveroo boss

Restaurants “are hurting” due to the coronavirus pandemic, the boss of food courier Deliveroo has told the BBC.

“Even if restrictions are lifted soon, there’s going to be a long period of socially-distanced dining,” said Will Shu.

Deliveroo has expanded its UK customer base, with coronavirus accelerating the adoption of delivery apps, he said.

Speaking to the BBC’s Today programme, Mr Shu said that “Covid-19 really has marked a new era of delivery.”

“Since we started Deliveroo, there’s been this incredible adoption towards online and apps. But I think Covid-19 has brought forward this consumer behaviour by about one to three years.”

“On the other hand, our restaurant partners are hurting,” he said.

Although restaurants will be allowed to reopen in England on 4 July with social distancing measures in place, Mr Shu said that he believed that “there’s going to be an increased demand for delivery and collection.”

Will

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KNC Beauty Founder Launches Zoom School for Black Female Entrepreneurs

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Beauty entrepreneur Kristen Noel Crawley, the founder of KNC Beauty, is starting an online educational platform meant to help other Black female entrepreneurs succeed with their beauty businesses.

The program is called KNC Beauty School and it makes its debut online July 14. Crawley and other Black female executives, including Trinity Mouzon of Golde and Melissa Butler of The Lip Bar, will provide four semesters of free information on entrepreneurship, facing adversity, social media and marketing and strategic partnerships and investors.

“We’ll be going over resources and giving advice from other female founders to women of color who want to start a business or are in the early stages of their business,” Crawley said.

Interested entrepreneurs can sign up through a registration link available via Crawley’s Instagram account, where she has more than 400,000 followers.

Crawley had found that after speaking at industry

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