Day: June 29, 2020

Reset: Consumer Behavior

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Beauty consumers will never be the same.

On the heels of a global health crisis and social uprising demanding true justice for all, everything from how we buy to what we expect from the brands we use has been permanently altered.

“We’ve been seeing remarkable behavior changes across so many categories as a result of the pandemic, and beauty is no exception,” says Kristopher Hull, senior vice president, senior client officer at Ipsos.

“The pandemic has had an impact on what [people] buy, where they buy it, their openness to new brands,” he continues. “Also, it’s having an impact on how they think about shopping after the pandemic eases up and as the economies reopen.”

As confinement is being rolled back in countries around the world, people’s appearance remains important to them. Just under 60 percent of those recently polled worldwide by Mintel

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What does Miami distillery make when bars are closed? (Hint: Don’t drink it.)

Toast Distillers’ signature product was premium vodka. But when unemployment increased and medical supplies became scarce nationwide, Toast switched formulas to solve both problems.

The company hired 15 new employees as it shifted production from spirits to hand sanitizer, said founder and CEO Dieuveny “DJ” Jean Louis. The “EZ Hand Sanitizer” is created in a partnership with the Cosmetic Corporation of America, Inc. and Veritas Farms, Inc.., which sells its products in Walgreens, CVS and Rite Aid.

“When the whole pandemic happened, we saw a window of opportunity,” he said.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic Toast distillers began using their alcohol distilling facility to produce hand sanitizer. It is mostly for sale but they have donated as well.
Due to the coronavirus pandemic Toast distillers began using their alcohol distilling facility to produce hand sanitizer. It is mostly for sale but they have donated as well.

Toast Distillers now employs about 30 people. Louis said he has not had to apply for any government aid because of a public demand for the new product. Toast Distillers came together

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‘Do we still want to move?’ Homebuyers rush back in droves despite pandemic

Dr. Rishi Manchanda toured empty homes in Los Angeles, California. By appointment only. In gloves and masks, and six feet from the real estate agent. But even in a pandemic, Manchanda and his family were still ready to buy a home.

“Nobody knew what was coming and the housing experts we talked to were uncertain about the market,” Manchanda said. “So, it came down to a simple question: ‘Do we still want to move?’”

Read more: Coronavirus: Here’s what to do if you can’t pay your mortgage

For Manchanda and many other buyers, the answer remains yes. He’s part of the wave of homebuyers who are flooding the market after the coronavirus and state lockdowns halted the economy in April, interrupting the busiest home-buying season of the year.

Now they’re back — in spite of outbreaks and an unsteady economy — and they face old and new foes: a persistent

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As America faces racial reckoning, I’m checking my white privilege, and here’s why you should too

Emily Volz is a psychology graduate student at Pacifica Graduate Institute specializing in Community, Liberation, Indigenous, and Eco Psychologies. Here, in a personal essay below, Volz shares how the racial awakening and protests across the country have made her check her privilege and how an intervention is necessary within white America.

My family owns a building in downtown Seattle. On May 31, I woke up to images of the building in a Seattle Times article. The images show shattered windows, mannequins toppled and goods scattered.

One photo shows several police officers walking out of the building, a symbolic image of the structural causes of the destruction.

I spoke with my mom that afternoon. “I’m not mad,” she told me.

MORE: After racist park encounter, Chris Cooper takes us birding in Central Park

Losing windows is nothing compared to losing Black lives. Every single death is a loss to our nation,

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Billions of dollars in aid for small businesses go unclaimed

NEW YORK (AP) — Billions of dollars offered by Congress as a lifeline to small businesses struggling to survive the pandemic are about to be left on the table when a key government program stops accepting applications for loans.

Business owners and advocacy groups complain that the money in the Paycheck Protection Program was not fully put to work because the program created obstacles that stopped countless small businesses from applying. For those that did seek loans, the ever-changing application process proved to be an exercise in futility.

“It was a flawed structure to begin with,” said John Arensmeyer, CEO of Small Business Majority, an advocacy group. “It favored established businesses. It was set up to give money to people with strong banking relationships.”

The program’s shortcomings also made it more difficult for minority businesses to get loans, according to a report from the Center for Responsible Lending, a research

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Jacksonville, the host of GOP convention, mandating masks; Broadway closed until 2021;

The city scheduled to host the GOP convention is mandating masks and Broadway stages will remain dark through 2020 amid a national boom in coronavirus cases. However, the nation’s leading infectious diseases expert remains “cautiously optimistic” that a vaccine could be widely available by year’s end.

Also, a drug company’s steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proved to shorten recovery times for severe COVID-19 patients by about 31%, is drawing criticism.

Jacksonville, Florida, on Monday joined the growing ranks of cities requiring face coverings to help curb spread of the virus. It’s not clear how long the order will remain in place. The Republican convention is scheduled for Aug. 24-27 at the VyStar Veterans Memorial Arena in Jacksonville and President Donald Trump has famously refused to wear a mask in public.

Nashville, Tennessee, is requiring masks as of Monday. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for 

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Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Everything you need to know about visiting France this summer

Getty
Getty

As tentative signs start to emerge of a revival for the travel industry, our minds are turning to potential holiday destinations for this summer.

France, as our closest neighbour barring Ireland, makes sense for a first international sojourn.

But can British holidaymakers get there? And will we be welcome if we go?

Here’s everything you need to know.

Am I allowed to travel to France from the UK?

At the moment, the Foreign Office is advising against all non-essential international travel – including to France.

The ban doesn’t make travel abroad “illegal” as such – but it does invalidate your travel insurance and means you may find it tricky to get help from the embassy or consulate if things go wrong.

However, the government is expected to announce that this blanket warning will be relaxed from 6 July, alongside the ditching of compulsory quarantine for inbound travellers from countries

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Where to Buy Face Masks That Are Stylish Online

The fashion world is stepping up in a time of need: Countless companies are now making, selling and donating non-medical grade face masks for daily protection from COVID-19.

Demand for cloth face mask options has soared in recent months, in part because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) masks in public settings to help slow the spread of COVID-19. PPE masks are usually made from breathable a fabric like cotton and differ from a surgical mask and N95 respirators that experts say should be reserved for health care workers who are caring for the sick.

In times of crisis, it’s heartwarming to see companies we love giving back using the tools and skills they know best. Nordstrom, the largest employer of tailors in the country, has trained its alterations teams to make face masks to distribute to health care workers, while designer

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This critical link could help bridge America’s racial wealth gap

The racial wealth gap — the disparity in median wealth between the different races — is a persistent struggle, and it appears to be worsening, especially between White and Black Americans.

According to a recent study by McKinsey & Co., Black Americans can expect to earn up to $1 million less than White Americans over their lifetime. The median White family had more than 10 times the wealth of the median Black family in 2016, according to the Federal Reserve’s most recent Survey of Consumer Finances. White families had the highest level of median wealth, at $171,000, while Black families median wealth was $17,600 and Latino families was $20,700.

White workers, on average, are paid more than Black and Latinx workers at almost every education level, according to a 2018 report by the Economic Policy Institute. Whites with an advanced degree received an hourly wage of $44.46, while Latinx earned

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